Day 147...

Oh man...

  "god is in the details"  - Ludwig Mies van der Rohe

"god is in the details" - Ludwig Mies van der Rohe

I know this is the second kitchen post in a row, but as we near completion, I feel that I really want to share the details.  Both good and bad.  If my mom was around I know she would have used one term to describe the kitchen.  I believe she would have called it a "jewel box" That was often how we referred to small spaces that paid attention to detail. With this remodel, I made a choice not to break through my dining room wall to make one large kitchen/dining space.  In doing that, I bucked the current trend of the open "Great Space" and opted to stay with my kitchen's original foot print, but to make it far more efficient, with better cabinetry, and shelving. In making the decision to stay with the same footprint, I also felt that it was important to incorporate some of the original molding details in the adjacent rooms.  that would have gone swimmingly, however, the moldings that were made for this house in 1936, are apparently not flying off the shelves these days, so in a fit of saying yes to everything to speed up the process, I quickly glanced at a crown molding that in a 4" segment looked just fine...ya, not so good in 50 lineal ft.  Here's the boring part, when you mitre a molding at 45 degrees, (unless it it super simple), it gets pretty bold, honestly, it was such a minute curve that I did not like, but it changed the whole profile. So on one fateful friday afternoon, I became my one worst client, and asked my very amenable and talented cabinet maker to demo all of the installed crown molding and find something less fussy.  You would think that as a designer, I would not make simple mistakes like that, but lo and behold, I did.  But in a jewel box, all the little details matter.  I thought my husband would be furious at me, and say it was not even noticeable, but god bless him, he felt the same way, and gave me his blessing to replace what had been installed.  Will post more pics soon, and to paraphrase the great Ludwig Mies van der Rohe, God surely is in the details.